Maths Workshop for Parents

Early Years Foundation Stage

Maths in Foundation Stage

Maths is one of the 7 areas of learning and throughout Foundation our responsibility is to:

¨provide children with opportunities to develop

and improve their skills in counting, understanding and using numbers, calculating simple addition and subtraction problems; and to describe shapes, spaces, and measures.¨

From Statutory Framework for Early Years Foundation Stage

Numbers: children count reliably with numbers from 1 to 20, place them in

order and say which number is one more or one less than a given number.

Using quantities and objects, they add and subtract two single-digit numbers

and count on or back to find the answer. They solve problems, including

doubling, halving and sharing.

Shape, space and measures: children use everyday language to talk about

size, weight, capacity, position, distance, time and money to compare

quantities and objects and to solve problems. They recognise, create and

describe patterns. They explore characteristics of everyday objects and

shapes and use mathematical language to describe them.

From Statutory Framework for Early Years Foundation Stage

Foundation:

By the end of Foundation Stage children should be able to confidently:

  • Count forwards to 100 in unison with other children.
  • Count backwards from at least 10.
  • Know the next number for any number up to 10, e.g. eight, ____.
  • Match one-to-one in counting e.g. one counter, two counters …
  • Recognise numbers up to and including 6 without having to count: do children recognise arrays, e.g. 6 dots on a dice, without counting?
  • Match numbers to fingers, e.g. hold up 7 fingers (without counting each finger).
  • Begin to compare numbers, e.g. knowing that 6 is bigger than 4.
  • Understand the concept on ‘more than’ and ‘less than’.
  • Recognise the difference between ‘flat’ and ‘solid’ shapes and describe shapes by mentioning a property, e.g. this one rolls, this one has corners…
  • Spot and continue patterns
  • Compare the size of things using mathematical language, e.g. Tom is taller than me.

Class rules and routines

  • Counting how many children are present each day
  • Subtracting the absent children from the normal class size
  • Knowing the size of the class
  • Knowing the times of activities
  • Working in twos or threes
  • Ordinal numbers- 1st/2nd/3rd person or time
  • Singing of number songs and use of practical objects as well as parts of the body to accompany the songs.
  • Useful youtube links for helping at home:
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sov5gM_FvpY
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0uenvW3DrMI
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5nmx7U_F17Q
  • In order to count accurately a child needs to count out or take a specified number of things from a larger collection of objects showing reliable 1:1 correspondence by touching each object in turn.

We focus on one number at a time in FS

We play games and complete reinforcement activities such as:

  • Numbers stuck on trees and children run to a given number
  • Shells with numbers on hidden in the sand
  • Number jigsaw puzzels
  • Numbers in feely bags
  • Collage numbers
  • Matching numbers to picture quantaties
  • We have rhymes for forming each numeral see:

http://www.communication4all.co.uk/Numeracy/Number%20Formation%20Rhyme%20Cards.pdf

  • Air write numbers
  • Writing on whiteboards
  • Using paint and chalk
  • Writing in a tray of glitter
  • Matching numbers and groups of objects
  • Counting a number of objects and making a set of them and saying how many
  • Showing a number of fingers to a given number
  • Teacher says number and children show number of objects.

What is it? A number of objects can be arranged in a certain way and counted. The same objects can be moved around and arranged differently, yet the number is the same because none have been removed.

Children’s misconceptions: Some children think that moving the objects automatically changes the number.

Activities to reinforce understanding: Practice arranging, counting and rearranging objects. Dominoes and dice are useful resources.

Recognising differences in quantities

Children learn to visually distinguish different amounts-eg- “you’ve got more peas than me!”

They can use the langauge greater and smaller and less and more

Addition-Songs and rhymes which add on one each time

Practical activities to combine two amounts “How many altogether?”

Subtraction-Song and Rhymes

Counting out objects and asking if I take one away what will I have?

In all activities the level of difficulty will depend on the individual level of the children

Teacher will model correct number sentence recording on the board

Simple questions such as these can be asked regularly at home.

 

Recognising differences in quantities

Children learn to visually distinguish different amounts-eg- “you’ve got more peas than me!”

They can use the langauge greater and smaller and less and more

Addition-Songs and rhymes which add on one each time

Practical activities to combine two amounts “How many altogether?”

Subtraction-Song and Rhymes

Counting out objects and asking if I take one away what will I have?

In all activities the level of difficulty will depend on the individual level of the children

Teacher will model correct number sentence recording on the board

Simple questions such as these can be asked regularly at home.

Once a child can recognise and name each number and can say them in order, a new task is for them to arrange in order a complete set of numbers from 1-10. One step further is to remove one or two numbers and challenge the children to arrange in order the numbers they have, leaving spaces for the missing number.

Aim of our style of teaching

The aim is for children to do mathematics in their heads, and if the numbers are too large, to use pencil and paper to avoid losing track.

To do this children need to learn quick and efficient methods, including appropriate written and mental methods.

What can you do?